A very hot oven quickly roasts the potatoes and finishes the chicken without overcooking. The simple oil mixture, using solely extra-virgin olive oil to keep it paleo-friendly, packs a ton of flavor without adding excessive calories or fat to an already flavorful dinner. To serve a family, double the recipe and use an additional sheet pan for added space. You can substitute fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise, for the small Yukon gold potatoes.
The paleo diet may not be the new kid on the block anymore but it remains a popular and a powerful way to lose weight and improve your health overall. The basic idea is that you’re following the eating approach of our ancestors. By doing so, you’re focusing on food that our bodies should be strongly adapted to. Likewise, you’re avoiding refined foods, along with the heavy reliance on sugar that plagues modern society.
Nevertheless, this is one paleo cookbook that slightly varies the diet. In particular, the author’s definition of paleo includes both potatoes and rice. There is a coherent argument provided for why this is the case and many paleo followers do agree. Still, the decision won’t sit well with everybody on a paleo diet, so it is something to bear in mind.
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.

These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.


Get the taste of Thailand in a turkey burger so you can cut out a lot of the fat that comes with beef. On Paleo you want to mix up the type of meat you’re eating, and turkey makes a great choice. It will still give you protein and a savory flavor, and can be a nice respite from beef. In this burger they have red chilli and ginger being used to try to capture some of the Thai flavor, and they’ve served it open-faced on slice of Paleo bread. The avocado on top is a nice addition, it cools off the spices and adds fiber and potassium.
Hey Amanda, I’d love to try this as well. I’m not sure if they will freeze well, but I don’t see why not. I think freezing the chicken salad would be smarter, and taking that out on a Sunday and just packing those up for the week and storing in the fridge may be better. The wraps probably don’t freeze well. But for most of my once a month cooking, it always requires a bit of assembling the week of! Does that make sense?
Slow cookers are amazing tools for any person and any kitchen. I love the fact that you can put it in and go back hours later without having to do much of anything in between! The great thing about this cookbook is that it's simple and gets straight to the point. With only 40 recipes in the book, you won't get overwhelmed by an overload of possibilities and ideas. Instead, you can focus on what really matters: the food!

Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.

Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.
These pork chops are some of the best we’ve seen, and it is through a combination of preparing the pork chop correctly, and topping it with a delicious fruit slaw. When choosing the pork for your pork chops, you want to make sure that you go with an organic brand, rather than conventional. This is true with all of the meat you purchase for Paleo meals because it won’t be loaded with antibiotics, and the animals will have been fed organic feed. For the fruit in this, you’re also going to want to stick with organic peaches, plums, and apricots to avoid chemicals and pesticides.
Regardless of the origin of the name, the caveman diet has many of the same principles as the paleo diet. It’s focused primarily on the consumption of higher quantities of real, unprocessed, non-packaged food that cavemen could have eaten thousands of years ago, before Safeway, Walmart, and all of the other mega-super-duper-grocery stores we have available in today’s world came into being. Here are the basics:
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.
These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.
If you are planning on doing a Whole30 in the New Year, then this book is a perfect resource. Almost all of the recipes are Whole30 approved. The first 30 pages of this book are filled with information that will teach you how to adapt a Paleo lifestyle and live it successfully. This book is packed with 200 recipes and quick meal ideas! Melissa has even included adaptations for those of you following an Autoimmune Protocol. This section is particularly helpful, as it is often hard to find Paleo recipes that are also void of nightshades and nuts. Read my full review here.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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