I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
If you love Mediterranean food as much as I do, then you need this book. The recipes are delectable, hardy, yet simple to make. Caitlin’s husband, Nabil co-wrote this book with her. He is a classically trained chef and you will find his chef’s tips included all through out the book. Caitlin is a Paleo oriented holistic nutritionist. You will also find a shopping list, a healthy food buying guide and nutrition tips form her all throughout the book. Read my full review here.
This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
This recipe gives you dinner party elegance in a 20-minute dish. We rely on sea bass, a tender, mild-flavored fish with a lovely buttery quality. There are several sustainable options to choose from (Atlantic black sea bass, for one), so ask questions at the fish counter to ensure you're making a responsible choice. You can also use cod, sablefish (also called black cod), striped bass, or barramundi with great results.
This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
Apples are one of the healthiest fruits you can have, and are something our ancestors would have eaten anytime they came upon an apple tree. Here they’re filled with tasty things like raisins, brandy, cinnamon, and nutmeg, all baked right inside a cored apple. This means that the flavor gets infused right into the apple, which softens up during the baking process. Giving up dessert is not necessary on Paleo, it’s simply a matter of changing your idea of what dessert has to be. You’re getting a healthy and satisfying dessert here with no added sugar.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
These meatballs attempt to capture the taste of chicken enchiladas verde, so if you don’t feel like making up a giant pan of Paleo friendly enchiladas, you can go with this meatball recipe and get a similar results. They are able to pull it off by using a pound of ground chicken, and you want to make sure that the chicken is organic. They are using almond flour to replace breadcrumbs that you’ll usually find in meatball recipes to help hold it all together. They also have it topped with some salsa verde to complete the green enchilada mission.

Not only will you have the ideal main dish recipes, but this book includes breakfast and desserts as well.  This gives you everything you need throughout the day and you’ll never get bored with your food choices.  You’ll certainly want to keep your slow cooker at the ready when you can prepare such delicious menu items that are thoroughly satisfying.  From paleo sweet potato shepherd pie to Asian inspired pepper steak—your menu week after week will stay stunning while also ensuring you can stay fit and healthy at the same time!


How does pre-order work? If you order now, ahead of the January 6 release date, you’ll enjoy 25% savings off the cover price. Early bird gets the worm here! Then, when the book is finally released, it’ll be automatically shipped to you. Bonus: Usually pre-ordered books arrive a few days before the actual release date, though that isn’t a promise. Pre-orders are handled through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Google Play or IndieBound.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body, by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD. This book is billed as a solution for autoimmune diseases, in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. In the text, Ballantyne discusses her own struggles with autoimmune disease and helps guide readers on how the paleo diet may help relieve their symptoms, too.

According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.


This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.
As the name suggests, this paleo cookbook specifically targets people who are training while also on the paleo diet. This could include many different groups of people, including those who participate in sports, bodybuilders and individuals who simply want to increase their muscle mass. The overall style works well, especially for people who are already interested in performance but are new to paleo.
Grilled Seabass with Caramelized Brussels Sprouts Thai Steamed Mussels Teriyaki-Style Salmon with Veggies Spicy Fish With Cabbage Slaw Spicy Grilled Jumbo Shrimp Fried Fish Tacos Buffalo Shrimp Lobster Salad with Taro Chips Asian Marinated Tuna with Shaved Salad Shrimp Ceviche with Tostones Halibut with Peach and Pepper Salsa Sesame Spiced Tuna Crispy Coconut Shrimp With Mango Sauce Rosemary-Skewered Scallops Crab Stuffed Shrimp Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Shrimp Burgers with Pineapple-Avocado Salsa Sweet Lemon Shrimp Orange-Rosemary Seared Salmon Smoked Salmon With Fresh Vegetables Tuna Burgers Spicy Tuna And Cucumber Bites Salmon Cakes Mussels in white wine sauce Fish tacos Creamy tomato baked scallops Shrimp in fruity salsa Garlic Shrimp With Zucchini Noodles

Brandi currently lives in Kansas City, Missouri and is a self-taught cook and fitness enthusiast. She has focused on healthy recipe development and exercise for 5+ years after reaching a fitness plateau and struggling to lose weight and maintain body goals. Brandi’s goal is to share recipes and workouts that support a consistently healthy lifestyle.
A trip to Brazil is just minutes away when you let this stew simmer. It’s loaded up with flavor thanks to citrus fruits, cayenne peppers, and fish sauce. There’s also a combination of white fish and shrimp, so you’re getting some good quality protein to make this a meal. And let’s not forget the veggies, which include tomatoes and onions, made all the more delicious by the seasonings and spices. The perfect dish to make when you want seafood but don’t want to turn on the oven.
Sally Jones is a writer and editor living in New York City. She has worked at many websites including iVillage, Ladies Home Journal, More, Parenting, Cosmopolitan, The Knot and YourTango, in jobs ranging from editor to COO. Renovation and interior design are her unhealthy obsessions hobbies. She has renovated every home she's lived in, including the rentals, and like... whoa, who does that? You can catch her at her blog Renov8or.
i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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