This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
This one is a New York Times bestseller and has even sold over one hundred and fifty thousand copies. That's a lot of books - and a lot of people reading! The best part about Paleo for Beginners is that it even includes a huge list of all the foods you can eat while following a Paleo diet. Now you won't have to wonder if your favorite food is allowed!
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
The pretty and sophisticated recipes are all fine and dandy, but more often than not what we really need on a day to day basis is a bunch of quick and easy recipes that we can prepare without much involvement or fancy ingredients. It surely helps us stick to Paleo when cooking doesn’t seem like a chore or a puzzle three times a day. You’ve got to have some time off from the kitchen and still be able to eat the best food for your health.
Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans takes a humorous approach to the positive lifestyle of a Paleo diet. The book contains more than one hundred "nomtastic memories" for anyone looking to extend their Paleo recipe repertoire. Written by authors Michelle Tam and Henry Fong - an accomplished husband-and-wife duo, the Nom Nom Paleo cookbook has received many awards for its five-star recipes.
This is a wonderful green bean salad that will be bursting with flavor. Go with organic green beans and you’ll be able to tell the difference in how they taste. The additional ingredients are all Paleo inspired, with walnuts as a source of healthy fat, something that you’re supposed to get enough of each day you’re on Paleo. She’s also using a red onion, and olive oil. Olive oil is additional healthy fat, and the Paleo diet is one of the few diets out there that places such a primary importance on getting healthy fats into your body.
I used to think that I could accomplish all my goals with food. If I ate a certain amount or a certain type of food, I could control everything. That worked for a while until my life started unraveling from ignoring the whole picture. Now I understand the importance of a balanced approach in all areas of life. These wellness articles will allow me to share all the aspects I share to create the life I love.
It’s natural to want crunchy foods, but on Paleo you won’t want to subject yourself to many of the crunchy options out there. In this recipe they are coating a snapper fillet with sesame seeds, so you will get the delicate texture of the fish juxtaposed with the crunchy sesame seeds, all fried up in grass fed butter. The frying makes sure that the sesame seeds have a nice toasted flavor, and they point out that if you don’t have grass fed butter you can also use ghee or bacon fat to fry the fish in. This fish goes great with any number of vegetables as a side, and we like to recommend broccoli as a healthy option.
I used to think that I could accomplish all my goals with food. If I ate a certain amount or a certain type of food, I could control everything. That worked for a while until my life started unraveling from ignoring the whole picture. Now I understand the importance of a balanced approach in all areas of life. These wellness articles will allow me to share all the aspects I share to create the life I love.

The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.

This chicken salad keeps things light and has an eclectic mix of meat, fruit, and vegetables, so you’ll feel great after eating it. While some might think that Paleo eating doesn’t include salads, this is a misperception. In fact, you’ll likely end up eating more salads than you ever did before so you can balance out a meal. This salad makes a great lunch, and will surely give you energy to help you through the rest of the day, without a sluggish after lunch feeling. Consider using baby spinach or baby kale leaves instead of ordinary lettuce for the base.
In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.
Description: Low-fat or low-carb? A recent New York Times Magazine (July 7, 2002) cover story answered this question and said that Dr. Atkins was right all along, “its not fat that makes us fat but carbohydrates.” Though the government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in research trying to prove that fat is the cause of obesity, there has been a subtle shift in the scientific consensus over the past five years supporting what the low-carb diet doctors have been saying all along: if we eat less carbohydrates, we will lose weight and live longer.

One of the best features of this book is that it has pairing and variations of ingredients that you can use. And if you're going Paleo, sometimes it can be hard to pick what ingredients are Paleo "compatible" that are available on your cupboard or available in a local grocery near you. The meals are easy to prepare and delicious. This book emphasizes on meal planning and preparation which helps you save a lot of time.​
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