This New York Times bestselling cookbook from Danielle Walker presents 125 recipes for grain-free, dairy-free, and gluten-free com...fort food dishes for holidays and special occasions. When people adopt a new diet for health or personal reasons, they worry most about the parties, holidays, and events with strong food traditions, fearing their fond memories will be lost along with the newly eliminated food groups. After suffering for years with a debilitating autoimmune disease and missing many of these special occasions herself, Danielle Walker has revived the joy that cooking for holidays can bring in Danielle Walker's Against All Grain Celebrations, a collection of recipes and menus for twelve special occasions throughout the year. Featuring a variety of birthday cakes, finger foods to serve at a baby or bridal shower, and re-creations of backyard barbecue standards like peach cobbler and corn bread, Danielle includes all of the classics. There's a full Thanksgiving spread--complete with turkey and stuffing, creamy green bean casserole, and pies--and menus for Christmas dinner; a New Year's Eve cocktail party and Easter brunch are covered, along with suggestions for beverages and cocktails and the all-important desserts. Recipes can be mixed and matched among the various occasions, and many of the dishes are simple enough for everyday cooking. Stunning full-color photographs of every dish make browsing the pages as delightful as cooking the recipes, and beautiful party images provide approachable and creative entertaining ideas. Making recipes using unfamiliar ingredients can cause anxiety, and while trying a new menu on a regular weeknight leaves some room for error, the meal simply cannot fail when you have a table full of guests celebrating a special occasion. Danielle has transformed her most cherished family traditions into trustworthy recipes you can feel confident serving, whether you're hosting a special guest with food allergies, or cooking for a crowd of regular grain-eaters. read more

This sweet potato is stuffed with beef and blueberries, a combination that you may not have ever seen before. They all combine to form a very well-balanced Paleo meal, and you’re getting tons of antioxidants both from the blueberries and the sweet potatoes. The beef gives you protein, while sweet potatoes are a carbohydrate that is digested slowly by the body. There is just as much sweet potatoes as there is beef, with just a bit of blueberries added for good measure. This makes for a microcosm of what it’s like to eat a perfectly portioned Paleo meal.

They are snippets of my life and family. They show how I live as someone who eats and lives a primarily Paleo diet and lifestyle. It's real. I don't have the energy nor desire to dress these up and make them fake. You'll see me without makeup (some days), my kitchen messy, me eating stuff I shouldn't. You'll also see me give you tips on making things easier, things I like, and ideas for what to eat or do. And some days they won't have a darn thing to do with Paleo, health, or wellness – it'll just be me and my life.
The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.

Episode after episode, Bobby Berk, (the modern-minded interior designer on Netflix's Queer Eye revival) overhauls each frumpy living space to reveal a chic, perfectly organized and functional area in its place. We're taking hints from him and filling our homes with these understated but super-useful organizational helpers. Bobby says it best: "Design doesn't have to be daunting."


The book does also have a wide selection of different types of recipes, including dinners, desserts and snacks. This is both a good and a bad thing, depending on what you’re looking for. In particular, the style is great for variety. But, if you’re specifically looking for main meals, you may be disappointed, as a significant proportion of the recipes are for snacks and desserts.
The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.
Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.
Isn’t it awesome just how many foods you can have with Paleo. There’s virtually nothing that’s off limits as long as you’re using the right ingredients. In this version of the classic chocolate cream pie, the regular crust has been replaced with an almond-based crust so you’ll get more fiber and protein from the crust that you would with any flour-based crust. The chocolate is from cacao paste and isn’t filled with dairy or refined sugar. A perfectly chocolatey and healthy pie!
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.

A trip to Brazil is just minutes away when you let this stew simmer. It’s loaded up with flavor thanks to citrus fruits, cayenne peppers, and fish sauce. There’s also a combination of white fish and shrimp, so you’re getting some good quality protein to make this a meal. And let’s not forget the veggies, which include tomatoes and onions, made all the more delicious by the seasonings and spices. The perfect dish to make when you want seafood but don’t want to turn on the oven.
A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.

Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.
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