Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.
This book has seem excellent hard to find recipes for paleo soups/sauces. These recipes use ingredients that should be acceptable to most paleo dieters (unlike other books that use sugar,flours,and other debatable ingredients. The downside to this book is that it is short and spends a decent amount of time talking about fruit smoothies that are too high glycemic for me.
This sweet potato is stuffed with beef and blueberries, a combination that you may not have ever seen before. They all combine to form a very well-balanced Paleo meal, and you’re getting tons of antioxidants both from the blueberries and the sweet potatoes. The beef gives you protein, while sweet potatoes are a carbohydrate that is digested slowly by the body. There is just as much sweet potatoes as there is beef, with just a bit of blueberries added for good measure. This makes for a microcosm of what it’s like to eat a perfectly portioned Paleo meal.
This stew is made from a bunch of beef, some blueberries, carrots, and an onion. It may sound like a bit of an odd mix, but trust us, it works. A stew is the perfect platform to construct a great Paleo meal, and here there’s plenty of healthy foods being combined. You’ll get plenty of protein from all of that beef, as well as important minerals like iron. Blueberries consistently make the news because of their antioxidant value, and carrots have long been known to be healthy due to the beta Carotene they contain. Onions also add to the nutritional value of this meal, and it will definitely keep you satisfied for several hours.
If you thought pulled pork sliders were off the menu, you were wrong. You just have to find creative workarounds when you are making Paleo recipes. In this case they’ve replaced hamburger buns with sliced sweet potato, which gets the wheat out. They haven’t skimped on the pulled pork which is going to taste just like you’d expect it to if you ordered a pulled pork sandwich from a barbecue joint. Creativity is one of the main and factors when you are eating Paleo because nothing is really off limits, you just have to figure out how you can have it.
A good ol’ sandwich for lunch? Not if you’re eating paleo! The grain-free paleo diet is based on the human diet from over 10,000 years ago. This means foods that can be hunted or found straight off the tree or vine (no processed snacks here). So what is a paleo-friendly person on their lunch break to do? Here are 20 fantastic, healthy options that will have your non-paleo co-workers kale-green with envy.
These meatballs attempt to capture the taste of chicken enchiladas verde, so if you don’t feel like making up a giant pan of Paleo friendly enchiladas, you can go with this meatball recipe and get a similar results. They are able to pull it off by using a pound of ground chicken, and you want to make sure that the chicken is organic. They are using almond flour to replace breadcrumbs that you’ll usually find in meatball recipes to help hold it all together. They also have it topped with some salsa verde to complete the green enchilada mission.
This is an easy way to musakhan, and if you don’t know how to make this traditional dish, this is a great place to start. It uses plenty of chicken thighs, so you’ll be all set in the protein department. It also contains plenty of spices like allspice, cloves, and saffron. You’ll be getting a few onions in this, but you may want to eat a salad with it because there are not a lot of vegetables being used, and you want to create a nice balance between all that chicken and your vegetable intake. Don’t be afraid to try new recipes on Paleo, trial and error is how our species made it this far.
With Paleo it is important to use the proper amount of spices and seasonings so that you don’t get tired of just eating meat and vegetables all the time. In this recipe they have an interesting mix of spices, and use plenty of lime so you’ll get a citrusy, spicy flavor. It starts off with chicken thighs and breasts, and then coats it all in olive oil so the spices will stick to the meat better. They’re using coriander, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and sea salt so this is definitely not lacking in the flavor department.
If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.
This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.
So about the recipe… You have to buy the Paleo wraps online or if you’re from my area (Mandeville, Louisiana), my friend at Vive sells them. I’m not always a huge fan of buying Paleo products, but 1) these are only made of coconut, so they’re super healthy and 2) these are SO good and will give you so many new options for lunch. After you buy the wraps, make the chicken salad and use a Paleo mayo recipe. Do not get lazy about the Paleo mayo and buy store-bought; the Paleo mayo is much better. Mayo can be tough if you don’t follow directions. Happy lunch-making! Share with me in the comments your opinion on this recipe. 
These pork chops are some of the best we’ve seen, and it is through a combination of preparing the pork chop correctly, and topping it with a delicious fruit slaw. When choosing the pork for your pork chops, you want to make sure that you go with an organic brand, rather than conventional. This is true with all of the meat you purchase for Paleo meals because it won’t be loaded with antibiotics, and the animals will have been fed organic feed. For the fruit in this, you’re also going to want to stick with organic peaches, plums, and apricots to avoid chemicals and pesticides.
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.
5day Almond Meal asparagus Avocado Bacon Bacon Weave Beef BREAKFAST Breakfast Sandwich Brussels Sprouts Casserole cheese Chicken Cocktails Crockpot Deep Fryer DESSERT Easter Faux Bread Faux Pasta Faux Potatoes Friendsgiving Fry-day Keto Grilling KITCHEN TOOLS lunch Mushrooms Pefect Ratio Pizza Pork Quick Snacks side dish snacks Sous Vide Spaghetti Squash Special Meals Spinach Steak Stunt Cooking Super Bowl tapas Thanksgiving vegetables Vitamix Vitamix Recipes
It’s natural to want crunchy foods, but on Paleo you won’t want to subject yourself to many of the crunchy options out there. In this recipe they are coating a snapper fillet with sesame seeds, so you will get the delicate texture of the fish juxtaposed with the crunchy sesame seeds, all fried up in grass fed butter. The frying makes sure that the sesame seeds have a nice toasted flavor, and they point out that if you don’t have grass fed butter you can also use ghee or bacon fat to fry the fish in. This fish goes great with any number of vegetables as a side, and we like to recommend broccoli as a healthy option.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.

These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.
1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)

When it comes to healthy lunches you can make at home and then take to work, healthy wraps and creative sandwiches may come to mind. However, you don’t have to eat wraps and sammies in order to enjoy fresh, healthy lunches every day. In fact, prepping lunch can be even EASIER — you can make a one-pot Paleo meal, pack it up, and reheat it during the work day. Talk about easy-peasy! Here are our favorite one-pot Paleo and Whole30-approved meals to help tide you over on weekdays.
Casseroles are usually a big hit with the family, and perhaps no other casserole can match a pizza casserole. It’s like a pizza stacked onto another pizza and is sure to please the pickiest of eaters, even if that’s you. It’s also a Paleo-friendly recipe, with no crust to speak of, just layer upon layer of yummy items like eggplant, parmesan, sausage, and of course marinara sauce. When it comes to pizza you have to make the determination of how you feel about mozzarella cheese because it’s not a Paleo food, but many followers will have it now and then.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.
Sweet potatoes will likely become one of the foods you find yourself using a lot of when eating Paleo. That’s because they can be cooked up in so many different ways, and they also serve as a great replacement to white potatoes. In this soup they’ll add a creamy texture, as well as lots of flavor. They go great with bell peppers, and their choice of lemon and thyme can’t be beat. The great part is that they used leftover mashed sweet potatoes for this soup, which takes out a lot of the prep work and lets you get to the cooking and the eating faster.
Tacos can be tricky to make Paleo, but they’ve figured out a good way here by using portobello mushroom caps for the shells. These caps do a good job of holding all of the yummy taco-inspired ingredients, and by the time you finish one of these you’ll feel satisfied, and like you just had Taco Night. The thick texture of the mushrooms means you can pile on the taco toppings and you won’t have to worry about breaking the shell.

Dried Fruit Bars Bite-Sized Raspberry Popsicles Apple and Almond Butter Bites Acorn Squash with Walnuts & Cranberries Valentine’s Day Smoothie Bacon-Wrapped Avocado Baked Apple Chips Granola Bars Pumpkin Pie Smoothie Apple cinnamon fruit rolls Chocolate nut granola Morning Paleo smoothie Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Grilled peaches with Prosciutto and Basil Paleo Snacks Kale chips Raspberry-Lime Fruit Dip Chocolate Strawberry Hearts Banana Raisin Cookies Chunky Fruit Popsicles Bite-sized chocolate treats Broiled Grapefruit Fruit Pudding Fried Honey Banana
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Why not take a load off and plan your next Monday through Friday with some of these Paleo dinners you can make in a single pot? Whether it’s a skillet, a Dutch oven, a roasting pan, or a wok, all you need to do is throw in the ingredients and let heat do the rest. You’ll have more time to take a walk, hit the gym, or even just sit outside now that the sunlight is lingering!
In order to keep salads interesting you need to have an array of different ways to make them. In this grilled chicken salad recipe you’re starting with a basic chicken salad, but adding in items like raspberries, walnuts, and artichoke hearts to jazz things up and make it a meal that you look forward to time and time again. Top it with a basic balsamic vinaigrette or your favorite Paleo dressing and you’ve got a winner on your hands.

The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)

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