One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
Why not take a load off and plan your next Monday through Friday with some of these Paleo dinners you can make in a single pot? Whether it’s a skillet, a Dutch oven, a roasting pan, or a wok, all you need to do is throw in the ingredients and let heat do the rest. You’ll have more time to take a walk, hit the gym, or even just sit outside now that the sunlight is lingering!
Nevertheless, this is one paleo cookbook that slightly varies the diet. In particular, the author’s definition of paleo includes both potatoes and rice. There is a coherent argument provided for why this is the case and many paleo followers do agree. Still, the decision won’t sit well with everybody on a paleo diet, so it is something to bear in mind.
One of the best features of this book is that it has pairing and variations of ingredients that you can use. And if you're going Paleo, sometimes it can be hard to pick what ingredients are Paleo "compatible" that are available on your cupboard or available in a local grocery near you. The meals are easy to prepare and delicious. This book emphasizes on meal planning and preparation which helps you save a lot of time.​
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