I'm a guy, carnivore and amateur cook . I love meat so going Paleo isn't a great stretch for me, but I'm always looking for ways to bump up the flavor and elevate my cooking. What I like about this cookbook is that the recipes are easy to follow. But what I LOVE is the diversity of different cooking styles and meats used. The author takes you on a world wide trip of flavor and introduces you to proteins most people would be nervous to try to cook or eat. While you have your normal proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and lamb, you also get an intro to frog legs, gator, bison, buffalo, venison, elk, etc. Take a walk on the wide side and let your inner Captain Caveman taste buds scream in joy with these tasty and healthy recipes. Good Eats.

This book promises that you won’t be just a caveman following recipes, but that you’ll actually learn how to cook with the information they provide. It would be nice to become something of a master at cooking Paleo dishes, and with the simple, high-quality ingredients you find on the Paleo approved foods list there’s no reason why you can’t accomplish this goal. This is billed as a Paleo cooking masterclass, so you can get comfortable with the idea of cooking your own awesome foods, and leaving doubt and hesitation behind. Get the notion that Paleo is easy to follow by getting a crash course in how to do it right.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
This Crock Pot roast has everything you’d want from a traditional Sunday roast, all in one pot. The beauty of it is that everything comes out perfectly cooked so the meat is very tender and juicy and the carrots, celery, onions, and cauliflower all come out soft and ready to eat. A major bonus to this is just how easy it is to get everything prepared and put into the slow cooker. Most roasts will have you checking in on it from time to time, but this one let’s you relax for about 8 hours before you have to do anything else to it.
As pictured, these short ribs represent a perfectly portioned Paleo meal, because you’re getting nice a serving of vegetables along with your beef. Short ribs can be tough to cook, and often take a long time roasting or grilling, but she’s broken it down so that it’s a relatively easy recipe, and it’ll come out tasting great. She’s got them rested on top of a portabella mushroom cap, and served up with a side of broccoli, so this is not only a beefy meal, it’s also vegetable centric. Try these off the bone short ribs, and you’ll be hooked.
Two teaspoons of smoked paprika may seem like a lot, but it will help to form a nice crust on the pork as it sears in the pan. You can also sub 1 teaspoon ground cumin plus 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder. A hot oven will help the sweet potato wedges crisp up on the outside without burning. Remove the pork from the oven just as it reaches 140. The temp will climb to an ideal 145, and the meat will be just right. This is paleo version of one of our favorite weeknight dinners.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.

Butternut squash is great for you, kale is fantastic for you, so in this recipe you’re already starting off on the right foot. Next, add in some beef and you’re doing just dandy in regards to Paleo eating. That’s because you’re getting plenty of nutrition from the kale and squash, as well as the requisite protein from the beef, so you’ll feel satiated at the end of the bowl, and this is a stew that eats like a meal because it is a meal, it just happens to be in a bowl. You brown the meat in bacon fat, giving it wild amounts of flavor.

You can eat well and never worry about feeling deprived because this great cookbook offers creative meal ideas for even the pickiest of eaters.  Cravings are taken care of easily and time convenience is certainly gained with several weeknight meals included.  Everyone receives pre-made shopping lists to make the next grocery trip more convenient and productive.


Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)

With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.
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