Lately, I've been seeing more and more people talking about the Paleo diet and the best paleo cookbooks - and for a good reason. Although a lot of diets can often get complicated and hard to understand, the Paleo diet is pretty simple: only eat what a caveman would eat. What's better than being able to eat as much as you want and not have to track anything? Nothing! That's what I thought.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.
This dish is inspired by Kaldereta, a dish from the Philippines that is generally made with goat shoulders and liverwurst. They’ve replaced the goat shoulders with beef, but they’ve kept the liverwurst which is a good way to incorporate some organ meat into your caveman diet. If you end up liking it there are lots of other recipes you can use it in. The traditional way of making it can be pretty spicy with the use of hot peppers, and here they’re using a red pepper, as well as chile flakes, so it will be a bit spicy, but you can make adjustments to it depending on your personal taste.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Description: Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what’s making us fat—and how we can change—in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes’s crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.

Slow Cooked Garlic Artichokes Sautéed Swiss Chard With Bacon Sautéed Garlic Broccolini Grilled Balsamic Glazed Portobello Mushrooms Garlic Green Beans Roasted Mushrooms With Thyme Vegetables in a Creamy Pesto Sauce Spaghetti Squash with Creamy Mushroom Sauce Jalapeno Poppers Creamy Garlic Mushrooms Apple and Vegetable Stir-Fry Mini Pepperoni Pizza Bites Brussels Sprouts With Balsamic and Cranberries Sausage-Stuffed Jalapeño Bites Sweet Potato Bacon Cakes Creamed Spinach Mini Hamburger Bites Oven Roasted Garlic Cabbage Spicy Sweet Potato Wedges Cauliflower Tortillas Sweet Potato Bites with Guacamole and Bacon Zucchini cakes Roasted cauliflower with mint and pomegranate BLT Endive Bites Bell Pepper Pizza Bites Cauliflower and Bacon Hash Pesto Stuffed Mushrooms Oven Fried Pickles


Perhaps the most compelling part of this cookbook is the thousands of glowing reviews. People write that Meals Made Simple is the must-have for every paleo kitchen thanks to its delicious recipes and helpful shopping guides. One person even goes so far as to say this cookbook changed her life! If that doesn’t motivate you to check out this product, we don’t know what will.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
Eating Paleo is as hard or easy as having the right recipes to follow. Go into it alone and try to figure it out solo, and you’ll probably crash and burn. Go into it armed with an arsenal of delicious recipes already planned out for you, and in accordance with the Paleo guidelines of what to eat and what not to eat, and your chances of success improve dramatically. Here are the Top 10 Paleo Diet Cookbooks on the planet, so you can get the junk out of your life and start eating real, actual, food.
×