Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.


One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
The cooking methods, the kitchen equipment and the food culture in the illustrations are also based on archaeological finds. Even the clothes and the clay jars are finds from settlements or graves. The glass in the woman’s hand, for example, was found at an excavation site in Sweden. (Illustration: Communicating Culture & Atelier bunterhund Zürich)
The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.
Apples are one of the healthiest fruits you can have, and are something our ancestors would have eaten anytime they came upon an apple tree. Here they’re filled with tasty things like raisins, brandy, cinnamon, and nutmeg, all baked right inside a cored apple. This means that the flavor gets infused right into the apple, which softens up during the baking process. Giving up dessert is not necessary on Paleo, it’s simply a matter of changing your idea of what dessert has to be. You’re getting a healthy and satisfying dessert here with no added sugar.

Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.


Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.

If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.
I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.
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