This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
These apple chips are baked, not fried, so you’re already coming out on top compared to eating a bag of potato chips. Since you won’t be eating potatoes on Paleo it’s good to come up with a better alternative. These apple chips will have a sweetness to them, satisfying both your crunchy cravings as well as your sweet tooth. The best part is they only use two ingredients, apples and cinnamon, so there’s never any doubt as to whether these are healthy or not. Paleo isn’t very fruit centric, but you should be having at least one serving of fruit per day, and this can be it.

This book has seem excellent hard to find recipes for paleo soups/sauces. These recipes use ingredients that should be acceptable to most paleo dieters (unlike other books that use sugar,flours,and other debatable ingredients. The downside to this book is that it is short and spends a decent amount of time talking about fruit smoothies that are too high glycemic for me.

It’s natural to want crunchy foods, but on Paleo you won’t want to subject yourself to many of the crunchy options out there. In this recipe they are coating a snapper fillet with sesame seeds, so you will get the delicate texture of the fish juxtaposed with the crunchy sesame seeds, all fried up in grass fed butter. The frying makes sure that the sesame seeds have a nice toasted flavor, and they point out that if you don’t have grass fed butter you can also use ghee or bacon fat to fry the fish in. This fish goes great with any number of vegetables as a side, and we like to recommend broccoli as a healthy option.
Like the previous example, Nourish is focused on paleo recipes that are also relevant for people with autoimmune conditions. In this case, there are 120 recipes on offer and no shortage of images to inspire. The cookbook also has detailed information about why food is relevant to the body’s immune response and the types of food that you need to consider.
The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.
Kale chips make a great snack because they don’t contain anything that’s unhealthy for you. In this recipe she’s simply using curly kale and olive oil, so you are getting all of the benefits of kale, without any hydrogenated oils or industrial grade salt. You won’t believe how crispy and crunchy kale gets when you bake it until you try it. And since it is loaded with fiber, and has respectable amounts of potassium, with Vitamin A and Vitamin C levels that are off the charts, this is one of the healthiest snacks around. It’s also low in calories and fat, and the olive oil only adds healthy fat to the equation.
If you are planning on doing a Whole30 in the New Year, then this book is a perfect resource. Almost all of the recipes are Whole30 approved. The first 30 pages of this book are filled with information that will teach you how to adapt a Paleo lifestyle and live it successfully. This book is packed with 200 recipes and quick meal ideas! Melissa has even included adaptations for those of you following an Autoimmune Protocol. This section is particularly helpful, as it is often hard to find Paleo recipes that are also void of nightshades and nuts. Read my full review here.

i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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